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Center of Excellence for Emerging and Zoonotic Animal Diseases

BSL-3 trainingJordan field studies

CEEZAD

1800 Denison Ave
Mosier Hall, Room P200
Manhattan, KS  66506

785-532-2793   
785-532-3373 fax
CEEZAD@ksu.edu


 The Center of Excellence for Emerging and Zoonotic Animal Diseases (CEEZAD) at Kansas State University was established in 2010 to help protect the nation’s agricultural and public health sectors against a high-consequence foreign animal, emerging and zoonotic disease threats. CEEZAD has four principal missions:

  • Development of novel, safe, efficacious, and DIVA-compatible vaccines for prevention and control of high-impact emerging and zoonotic diseases that can be manufactured in the U.S.
  • Development and expansion of technologies and platforms for laboratory and point-of-need pathogen detection.
  • Development of models to predict high-consequence disease behavior in the U.S. to aid prevention or outbreak control.
  • Development of education and training programs for students, veterinarians, first responders, and researchers in high-impact animal diseases and animal emergencies.

 News/Events Highlights

 

January 21

 

New paper explores advances and gaps in SARS-CoV-2 research

The Director of the Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence For Emerging and Zoonotic Animal Diseases (www.ceezad.org)  is co-author of a newly published paper identifying recent advances and remaining gaps in SARS-CoV-2 infection models.

Dr. Juergen A. Richt, who in addition to his duties at CEEZAD is also the Regents and University Distinguished Professor at Kansas State University, was among more than a dozen worldwide co-authors of the paper, which was published in PLOS Pathogens

The article notes that the global response to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is

 now facing new challenges such as vaccine inequity and the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs). Preclinical models of disease, in particular animal models, are essential to investigate VOC pathogenesis, vaccine correlates of protection and post-exposure therapies.

 In the article, Dr. Richt and his fellow researchers provide an update from the World Health Organization (WHO) COVID-19 modeling expert group (WHO-COM) assembled by WHO, regarding advances in preclinical models. They discuss how animal model research is playing a key role to evaluate VOC virulence, transmission and immune escape, and how animal models are being refined to recapitulate COVID-19 demographic variables such as co-morbidities and age.

The full study can be read by following this link: https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1010161

 

CEEZAD team researches effect of feed mill batch sequencing on ASFV prevalence and distribution

A team of researchers from the Center of Excellence For Emerging and Zoonotic Animal Diseases (www.ceezad.org)  recently published a paper assessing the effect of mixing and feed batch sequencing on the prevalence of the African Swine Fever virus in swine feed. .

Dr. Juergen A. Richt, director of CEEZAD and the Regents and University Distinguished Professor at Kansas State University, was senior author of the paper, which was published in January in Transboundary Emerging Diseases.

Other authors from CEEZAD included Dr. Igor Morozov, Jessie Trujillo, Taeyong Kwon, Konner R. Cool, Natasha Gaudreault and Jordan Gebhardt. Researchers from the Department of Grain Science and Industry and Animal Sciences and Industry also participated.

The article notes the importance of having methods that can detect and mitigate the risk of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in potentially contaminated feed or ingredients bound for the United States. The article was designed to evaluate feed batch sequencing as a mitigation technique for ASFV contamination in a feed mill, and to determine whether a feed sampling method could identify ASFV following experimental inoculation.

Batches of feed were manufactured in a BSL-3Ag room at Kansas State University's Biosafety Research Institute in Manhattan, Kansas. First, the pilot feed manufacturing system mixed, conveyed, and discharged an ASFV-free diet. Next, a diet was manufactured using the same equipment, but contained feed inoculated with ASFV. Then, four subsequent ASFV-free batches of feed were manufactured.

After discharging each batch into a collection container, 10 samples were collected in a double 'X' pattern. Samples were analyzed using a qPCR assay for the ASFV p72 gene then the cycle threshold (Ct) and Log10 genomic copy number (CN)/g of feed were determined. Both the qPCR Ct values (p < .0001) and the Log10 genomic copy number (CN)/g (p < .0001) content of feed samples were impacted based on the batch of feed. Feed samples obtained directly after manufacturing the ASFV-contaminated diet contained the greatest amounts of ASFV DNA across all criteria (p < 0.05).

The research found that the quantity of ASFV DNA decreased sequentially as additional batches of feed were manufactured, but was still detectable after batch sequence 4.

In summary, sequencing batches of feed decreases concentration of ASFV contamination in feed, but does not eliminate it. Bulk ingredients can be accurately evaluated for ASFV contamination by collecting 10 subsamples using the sampling method described herein. Future research is needed to evaluate whether different mitigation techniques can reduce ASFV feed contamination.

The full study can be read by following this link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34076951/

 

BSL-3 Summer Program

Now Accepting Applications!

June 5-June 17, 2022

The USDA BSL-3 Training Program for Research Support Personnel is designed to provide introductory BSL-3/BSL-3 Ag training to research personnel, either current federal staff and research fellows or recent graduates from U.S. universities (BS, MS) with career interests in USDA Agricultural Research Service who want to attain additional training and knowledge in the area of high-containment research and as potential career choice.

The program is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service and is directed at highly motivated BS/MS level research support personnel interested in research and careers in the field of high consequence, transboundary and zoonotic diseases of animals. The two-week program consists of one week of intensive, hands-on and classroom training at the Biosecurity Research Institute (BRI; https://www.bri.k-state.edu/) at Kansas State University and the second week with in- person and/or virtual presentations (hybrid system) from area industry partners and seminars/lectures from national and international subject matter experts in high containment research and transboundary animal diseases.

The BRI, located adjacent to the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, or NBAF, contains an Education and Training area which includes a training laboratory with equipment that simulates BSL-3 research practices. Both, CEEZAD and the BRI are committed to training a specialized workforce to protect the nation's agriculture and public health sectors against high consequence transboundary, emerging and zoonotic diseases.

For more information and to apply:  https://ceezad.org/education/workforce_development/summer-program- veterinary.html

Eligibility Requirements

  • U.S. citizenship or Green card holders (eligible for ORISE fellowships)

  • Cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher on a 4.0 scale (for the respective BS and/or MS degrees)

Program Goals

  • Demonstrating an understanding of pathogen risk group classifications and biosafety levels

  • Identifying potential risks associated with executing standard laboratory practices

  • Engage in laboratory practices that reduce the potential for aerosol exposures

  • Identifying areas of potential vulnerabilities in the laboratory ecosystem/network to include how technology introduction may impact laboratory operations (cybersecurity), safety, security, and overall laboratory capability

  • Demonstrating essential biocontainment practices for use in BSL3, ABSL3 and BSL3 Ag settings.

Successful applicants will receive a travel stipend (up to $2,000) to cover transportation (to and from Manhattan, Kansas), lodging and per diem expenses. Applicants residing in or near the Manhattan, Kansas, area may not be eligible to receive a travel stipend. An on-campus housing option is available.

A certificate of completion for the program will be provided to signify the student/participant has attended the program and is familiar with basic knowledge of working in BSL-3 environments. (Note: This is not a certification program)

Please note that although the program is in-person following CDC/KSU COVID-19 rules and recommendations, due to the impact of COVID-19, the presentations by subject matter experts will be a combination of in-person and virtually. Social distancing guidelines to maintain a distance of 6 feet apart will be followed by all individuals involved in the program. Masks will be mandatory based on KSU and CDC guidelines.

All applications must be submitted to ceezad@ksu.edu by: Tuesday, March 1, 2022

For More Information, Please Contact:

Center of Excellence for Emerging and Zoonotic Animal Diseases Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506. Phone: 785-532-2793.

mail: ceezad@ksu.edu; kcortes@vet.k-state.edu

APPLY HERE: https://www.vet.k-state.edu/asp/ceezad_form/ceezad.aspx

Program Overview

Week 1: Classroom and hands-on BSL-3 training at the BRI

One week of training will address topics, techniques and essential practices to safely and successfully conduct research in a Biosafety Level-3 setting. By the end of the training the student will be able to:

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of risk group classifications and biosafety levels;
    2. Identify potential risks associated with executing standard laboratory practices;
    3. Engage in laboratory practices that reduce the potential for aerosol exposures;
    4. Identify, select, and defend high containment practices required when manipulating agents and toxins;
    5. Identify areas of potential vulnerabilities in the laboratory ecosystem/network to include how technology introduction may impact laboratory operations (cybersecurity), safety, security, and overall laboratory capability;
    6. Demonstrate essential biocontainment practices for use in BSL-3, ABSL-3 and BSL-3Ag settings.

Week 2: Industry overview and Speaker series

The final week will also include presentations by industry experts and lectures by academic and government experts in the fields of high biocontainment research and transboundary animal diseases. Topics covered may include:

    1. Careers in high-containment research
    2. Necropsy in high-containment research
    3. Rift Valley Fever virus
    4. African Swine Fever virus
    5. SARS-CoV-2 mitigation strategies Arboviral diseases of livestock
    6. Research in a BSL-4 environment (Ebola, CCHV or similar)
    7. Research at Plum Island Animal Disease Center
    8. Future projects at NBAF

All participants will be required to submit a final written report at the end of the program.